Diet + Health

Science and technology are developing at the fastest rates in human history.
We combine both and our goal is to make you as healthy as possible.

Longer term dietary advice is based on the fact that main dietary sources have different fatty acid group profiles.

Fat groups with main sources in your diet

Saturated fats

  • Fatty dairy products: milk, butter, cream cheese
  • Meat
  • Cakes and pastries
  • Biscuits and crackers
  • Sauces
  • Fast food, hamburgers, pizza
  • Surplus carbohydrates: sugar, starch, white bread, potatoes, rice and pasta

Monounsaturated fats (Omega-9)

  • Olives and olive oil
  • Rapeseed oil
  • Almonds
  • Avocado
  • Peanuts
  • Brazil nuts
  • Cashew nuts
  • Hazelnuts
  • Pistachio nuts

Polyunsaturated vegetable fats (Omega-6)

  • Vegetable margarine, vegetable oils, mayonnaise
  • Meat
  • Sunflower oil and corn oil
  • Soy bean oil
  • Grapeseed oil
  • Sesame seeds

All diets, including a balanced diet, will show some deviation from an average balanced diet. If your ‘Protection Value’ is above 90%, you do not need to balance your diet. The advice to increase energy intake should not be followed if your body mass index is above 25 (BMI = your weight in kg / (height in meter × height in meter)).

Saturated Fats (non-essential)

If you need to reduce your intake of saturated fats to improve your ‘Protection Value’ and ‘Cell Membrane Fluidity’, you should avoid the products listed under “Saturated Fats” in Figure 1, or you may shift to low-fat versions of the same products. Note that excess sugar in your diet will be converted to and stored as saturated fatty acids both in cell membranes and in adipose tissues. Thus, reducing your sugar and starch intake will also reduce the level of saturated fats in your body.

Increased consumption of pure meat combined with a limited intake of cheese and other dairy products is advised if your saturated fat intake needs to be increased. In general, we do not recommend increased intake of any other product groups listed under “Saturated Fats”.

Monounsaturated Fats (non-essential)

If you need to reduce your intake of monounsaturated fats to improve your ‘Protection Value’ and ‘Cell Membrane Fluidity’, avoid the products listed under “Monounsaturated Fats (Omega-9)” in Figure 1.

Monounsaturated fats are generally considered to be healthier than saturated fats, although the body is able to produce both fatty acid groups from other “raw materials” like proteins and carbohydrates. In the traditional low-calorie Mediterranean diet, the dietary ratio between monounsaturated and saturated fatty acid groups is close to 2:1. In Zinzino Balance products, the ratio between monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids is 2:1, just like in the Mediterranean diet.

Polyunsaturated Vegetable Fats (essential)

If you need to reduce your intake of polyunsaturated vegetable fats to improve your ‘Protection Value’ and ‘Omega-6:3 Balance’, avoid the products listed in Figure 1 under “Polyunsaturated Vegetable Fats (Omega-6)”, or you may shift to low-fat versions of the same products.

Try to avoid products that are formulated with high amounts of Omega-6 vegetable oils, such as sunflower oil, corn oil and soy bean oil. You can reduce your intake of Omega-6 by simply shifting to products that are formulated with vegetable oil sources low in Omega-6, such as olive oil and rapeseed oil. If your results indicate that your intake should be increased, then you may increase the intake of the same products.

Polyunsaturated Fish Fats (essential)

Today’s Western diets are generally deficient in Omega-3’s, compared with the diet on which humans evolved, and which helped establish our genetic patterns. Thus, most people need to increase their dietary intake of polyunsaturated fish fat. Since the vegetable Omega-3 (ALA) is not sufficiently converted to EPA and DHA in the body, the only food sources available to increase your intake of polyunsaturated fish fats are the various fatty fish species, such as those listed under “Polyunsaturated Fish Fats (Omega-3)” in Figure 1.

Intake of polyunsaturated fish fats (Omega-3 improves the following dietary indicators:

  • Protection Value
  • Omega-3 Index
  • Omega-6:3 Balance
  • Cell Membrane Fluidity
  • Mental Strength

The daily requirement of marine Omega-3’s EPA and DHA is dependent on body weight. Adults weighing 80 kg need to consume approximately 3 grams of Omega-3 (EPA+DHA) daily to increase their Omega-3 (EPA+DHA) level above 8%. A minimum of 4% Omega-3 (EPA+DHA) level in the fatty acid profile requires at least 0.5 gram Omega-3 (EPA+DHA) daily. Most Omega-3 supplements on the market recommend daily dosages of marine Omega-3’s in the range of 150 mg to 1.5 grams. This is far too low to reach the dietary target of above 8% Omega-3 (EPA+DHA) level if such Omega-3 supplements are not combined with daily consumption of fatty fish. A daily intake of 0.15 ml/kg body weight of BalanceOil will provide you with the required amount of marine Omega-3’s.

Your diet is reflected in the fatty acid profile of your blood. Your personal fatty acid profile is presented in your home test results, and forms the basis for our suggestions on how you may change your diet. The fatty acid profile provides an overview of the 11 most important fatty acids in your blood (98% of total fatty acids). To be able to change your diet efficiently, you need to know the fatty acid content of some common foods.

Almost all foods contain many different fatty acids, including saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids. However, the amount of those fatty acids varies from one food to another, making it possible to change the intake of fatty acids by changing the types of foods consumed.

The following is only a guideline providing examples of food sources for the 11 different fatty acids measured in our home test:

Palmitic acid, C16:0, saturated
Stearic acid, C18:0, saturated
Oleic acid, C18:1, Omega-9
Linoleic acid, C18:2, Omega-6
Alpha-linolenic acid, C18:3, Omega-3
Gamma-linolenic acid, C18:3, Omega-6
Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, C20:3, Omega-6
Arachidonic acid (AA), C20:4, Omega-6
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), C20:5, Omega-3
Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), C22:5, Omega-3
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), C22:6, Omega-3

Palmitic acid, C16:0, saturated

  • Milk and milk products, such as butter, cream, ice cream, sour cream, yoghurt, cheese, etc.
  • Red meat and products made from red meat
  • Palm oil and products that contain palm oil, such as pastry, crackers, fried potatoes, potato chips, etc.
  • Coconut and coconut oil
  • Avocado and products made from avocado
  • Poultry and products made from poultry
  • Eggs and egg products
  • Various nuts, such as almonds, peanuts and Brazil nuts
  • Wheat and products made from wheat

Stearic acid, C18:0, saturated

  • Milk and milk products, such as butter, cream, ice cream, sour cream, yoghurt, cheese, etc.
  • Red meat and products made from red meat
  • Palm oil and products that contain palm oil, such as pastry, crackers, fried potatoes, potato chips, etc.
  • Coconut and coconut oil
  • Avocado and products made from avocado
  • Poultry and products made from poultry
  • Eggs and egg products
  • Various nuts, such as almonds, peanuts and Brazil nuts
  • Wheat and products made from wheat

Oleic acid, C18:1, Omega-9

  • Vegetable oils, such as olive oil, rapeseed oil and sesame oil
  • Avocado and products made from avocado
  • Various nuts, such as almonds, peanuts, walnuts, hazelnuts and Brazil nuts
  • Zinzino Balance products

Linoleic acid, C18:2, Omega-6

  • Vegetable oils, such as corn oil, sunflower oil and soy bean oil
  • Pork meat and fat and products made from pork
  • Palm oil and products that contain palm oil, such as pastry, crackers, fried potatoes, potato chips, etc.
  • Avocado and products made from avocado
  • Poultry and products made from poultry
  • Eggs and egg products
  • Wheat and products made from wheat

Alpha-linolenic acid, C18:3, Omega-3

  • Vegetable oils, such as rapeseed oil and linseed oil
  • Found in spinach and Brussels sprouts
  • Found in berries like blueberries and lingonberries
  • Found in walnuts

Gamma-linolenic acid, C18:3, Omega-6

  • Found in minor amounts in vegetable oils and meat

Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, C20:3, Omega-6

  • Found in minor amounts in evening primrose oil and blackcurrant seeds

Arachidonic acid (AA), C20:4, Omega-6

  • Red meat and products made from red meat
  • Pork meat and fat and products made from pork
  • Lamb and products made from lamb
  • Poultry and products made from poultry
  • Eggs and egg products

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), C20:5, Omega-3

  • Fatty fish and products made from fatty fish
  • Liver of white fish
  • Seafood and algae
  • Zinzino Balance products

Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), C22:5, Omega-3

  • Fatty fish and products made from fatty fish
  • Liver of white fish
  • Seal oil
  • Seafood and algae
  • Zinzino Balance products

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), C22:6, Omega-3

  • Fatty fish and products made from fatty fish
  • Liver of white fish
  • Seafood and algae
  • Zinzino Balance products

An intake of BalanceOil based on your body weight will rapidly improve your Omega-3 levels and Omega-6/Omega-3 Balance. Use the recommended daily dosage of 0.15 ml oil/kg body weight. Recommended daily dosages of Zinzino BalanceOil will safely correct and maintain your Omega-6/Omega-3 fatty acid balance for life.

A good balance will improve general health and contribute to normalising heart, brain, eye and immune function. It is the joint effects of marine Omega-3’s EPA and DHA, as well as polyphenols from extra virgin olive oil that make Balance products unique.

Back
Instagram
Messenger
Email
Call us